Tips for using metallic thread with an embroidery machine.

Nothing adds a Christmassy sparkle to sewn decorations like metallic thread. Its unique look isn’t only useful at Christmas however, as it can give any project you are working on that extra dazzle it needs to go from good to great. But there are a few things that you need to keep in mind when using metallic, to ensure you don’t run into any issues.

 

 

Embroidery Machine Sewing Speed

When using metallic thread one of the most important things to remember is, it isn’t a race. You want to accomplish the metallic stitching slow and steady, lowering the stitch speed on your embroidery machine to anywhere between 300 to 400 stitches per minute. This will decrease the stress on the thread and greatly decrease the chance of thread breakage. Of course like all thread some metallics are more resilient than others which is why some will perform well at 400 stitches a minute while others will need to be reduced to 300. The best way to figure out the appropriate speed is of course, test stitching before beginning your project.

The Needle Choice

When using metallic thread the choice of needle is fairly important. If you have somewhat of a ‘general use’ needle, it may not quite cut it in this situation… or it may cut it too much! The eye of the needle being used must be longer, to reduce the tension on the thread as much as possible. This will once again reduce the likelihood of your thread breaking or shredding when creating your “in the hoop” machine embroidery design. It is possible to get needles specifically designed for use with metallic thread, so for best results these should be your first choice.

Thread Tension

Having the least possible tension on the thread before it enters the embroidery machine is of the utmost importance when working with metallic thread. This makes it even more important than usual for you to check that the thread is feeding through the embroidery machine correctly. Also, the thread should not be unwound from a flat position, this will reduce both the thread tension and chance of the thread twisting. Instead, a thread-stand/horizontal spooler should be used for the best results.

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Following these instructions should reduce the likelihood of your projects involving metallic threads from encountering issues. If you are taking all precautions and still having issues with thread breakage or shredding, HERE is a blog listing solutions for more general thread breakage causes, as the metallic thread may not be the problem.

The metallic thread really is a great way of adding a sparkle to any project. Once you have used it effectively in a project once you’ll find that many of your future designs can benefit from its use. So don’t give up! Keep testing and trying till you get it right, and make those decorations twinkle.

 

3 comments

  1. Thanks for information very helpful. I will try slowing the machine down as this was something I was not aware about.

  2. Thanks so much for this great information. I’m just getting into machine embroidery and enjoyed making your snowman the other day. Look forward to more good info. Merry Christmas

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